Rubber Stamp Tutorial

By special request, here is a quick little tutorial on the art of easy rubber stamping.

Supplies:

#2 Pencil, ball-point ink pen, linoleum cutters, paper, ink pad and rubber printing block.

1.  Draw your image onto a piece of paper with #2 pencil. When you are happy with your image, go over again with pencil to make sure the lines are strong and dark.  If you want to do a very simple image, you can draw directly onto the rubber printing block with a pen and skip to step 4.

 

 

2.  Now transfer this image onto the rubber printing block by putting image face down onto block and rub with pencil. You will have a backwards image. This is especially important when using images with words, letters or numbers.
3.  Once the image has transferred, go over penciled lines with ink pen.  This will give you a good image to carve around.

4.  Now start carving using the smallest cutter (size 1) and carefully go around all the lines.  Make sure you have good light and a steady hand.  You don’t want to loose a nose, eye or very important line.  *You can cut directly over the lines if you want a reversed image.
5.  Once the image lines have been carefully carved around, use a larger cutter to get rid of the excess rubber.

6. When you are done carving, gently wash off little bits and dry thouroughly.  Start stamping on a practice piece of paper to see your finished image.  You may need to go back and carve any missed areas.

 

I’ve used my new stamp for making thank you cards.  I hope this was helpful to those who have not yet played with rubber stamping.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Be Sociable, Share!
This entry was posted in Stamps, Tutorials, how to. Bookmark the permalink.

37 Responses to Rubber Stamp Tutorial

  1. carla says:

    Oh..that was fun to “watch”! I have had stamp-making supplies for almost a year, and I haven’t gotten around to using them, mostly because I didn’t know how to get the drawing onto the stamp. That looks fairly simple! This one turned out great:>

  2. Your stamps are so amazing – I must improve my drawing skills before attempting this again but you’ve encouraged me to try!

  3. Raq3000 says:

    Ooh, thanks for the refresher on how easy it is to make rubber stamps! It’s been a long time since I broke out my linoleum cutters. Love your thank-you card, so simple and what great line you have…
    How do you find the time?

  4. Diane says:

    Thanks for the tut! I going to try it this weekend!!

  5. krista says:

    Wow, that turned out beautifully Regina, Thanks for the tutorial!

  6. Carrin says:

    I can’t wait to try this. My daughter loves stamps and this will be perfect to do with her!

    thanks

  7. joanna says:

    Thanks for the tutorial. Another thing to add to the already huge list of things to try. You make it look so easy.

  8. plein jane says:

    ooh, so much fun! love that little guy on the trike!!! JoAnn Fabrics has Staedtler MasterCarve on sale for only $2.99 for a big thick block. Great stuff that carves like butter. I just started carving last week and it is so much fun I don’t want to do anything else. ANYTHING.

  9. Leah Adams says:

    This weekend my daugther discovered block prints at the Museum of Glass in Tacoma. She was instantly drawn to the form, and begged to stay to do more and more and more prints. I promised her we would do more at home, since I have the tools in my huge box of craft tools (I think I lent the brayer and it is still missing-in-action). I haven’t taken a picture of the prints we made, but is on my list for “next-blog-post”. Lo and behold, I spotted this on Whip-up. Craft synchronicity? Serendipity? Age of Aquarius?

  10. Leah Adams says:

    One last thing I forgot to mention along the serendipity lines: there was a bar my husband and I frequented before we were married called “Kismet”. When we were dabbling with baby names just a few months later, kismet was on our short list, but we ultimately chose Sophie. Fate vs Wisdom. Hmmm. Still, I find it amusing that I happened upon your blog, called Creative Kismet, reading about block printing, on a night where I’m working on my blog at 1am, trying to divine a more accurate name for a what i do and what I write. I’ll be back to read more.

  11. melissa says:

    this little tutorial is fantastic- I’m desperate to try carving my own stamps now. If only I had your amazing drawing skills…

  12. Pingback: Kismet Abounds « HomeWork

  13. Alejandra says:

    It´s a beatiful work!!! I like it!!

    Saludos desde Guatemala

  14. Maggish says:

    Hi! Wonderful rubberstamps you´ve made!! Is it ok if a write about them om my site? (www.pysselmani.se) It´s a swedish craft site :) /Maggish

  15. ScoulaCoono says:

    very interesting point of view, has never been conceived of this
    [url=http://aldebaran.blogsavy.com/]furcate[/url]

  16. Silvia says:

    Hi!
    Thanks for the great tutorial :)

  17. kittee says:

    thanks for this great tutorial. any suggestions where to find rubber blocks, do you usually order them online?

    i added a link to your blog from cake maker, your posts are so interesting.

    xo
    kittee

  18. Pingback: Rubber stamps / Radiergummistempel « morningflower’s blog

  19. Pingback: Rubber Stamping | Crafty Natalie

  20. natalie says:

    glad i came across your website! loved the tutorial and got a chance to make some stamps of my own!

  21. majesty says:

    Wow! Just the kind of easy, very useful craft idea that I’m looking for. More please!

  22. Susie says:

    I bought a grabbag of “fun stuff” at a yard sale. When I got home I found it had the 3 linoleum cutters in it. A search brought me to your tutorial. Thank you very much. Susie

  23. Juddie says:

    Hi there,
    I’ve recently decided to make some rubber stamps and I was so happy to find your tutorial today! I wish I could find Speedball products in Australia – will have to keep on hunting for them. Thank you for this and all your great tutorials!

  24. Pingback: Friday Links | salty

  25. nabila says:

    hi!!! thanx for the awesome tutorial…. and i must say your a really gifted person and eacha nd every thing on ur blog is awesome!!!!

  26. Marilia says:

    great tutorial! I love the result. Thanks for the adress here I can find the rubber printing block. I don’t know if this material already arrived in my country, Portugal.
    THANKS, SO MUCH;-)

  27. Pingback: Studio thursday | weloveyourwalls design blog

  28. suzana wanderley says:

    Muito lindo seu carimbo de borracha!!!
    Very beautiful your rubber stamp!!!!
    Congratulations,
    Suzana

  29. Almensaro says:

    Good day!
    I would like to present my site:
    praca wzbogaca [url=http://sprawdz-dostepnosc.blogspot.com/]praca wzbogaca[/url]
    To greet!
    See you!

  30. Diane says:

    Great tutorial! Thanks for sharing! ~Diane

  31. Wendy says:

    About the blocks you linked to, do they crumble much? The first ones I tried did, but the Mastercarve ones seem a bit pricey.

  32. mf says:

    Merci bonnes explications

  33. Sola says:

    Thank you for sharing your knowledge. God bless.

  34. O says:

    I have been coming across rubber stamps on my serach for postage stamps. The more i read the more interested i become. Thank you.

  35. Hi! I am looking to create a rubber stamp for my buisness cards! I can across your tutorial..awesome!
    Where are you from? Can you email me so I can ask you something!
    quijano.marisa@yahoo.com

    I love this post!!!!!!!!!!
    xo
    Marisa

  36. I’m really impressed together with your writing talents and also with the structure in your blog. Is that this a paid subject or did you customize it your self? Either way keep up the excellent high quality writing, it is uncommon to look a great blog like this one today..|

  37. profits says:

    What’s up friends, good paragraph and nice
    arguments commented here, I am actually enjoying by these.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>